Sheriffs Show Consideration to Renters of Foreclosures

by on Finance Foreclosures

Sheriff Nygren had an incident with a 73 year-old renter. The poor old man will be evicted not having any idea that the room he is renting, owned by a Woodstock-man, was in foreclosure. The old man was so thankful that he was made aware and hopes to make arrangements.

There is no law that requires advance notifications. In fact, sheriffs used to be hired by banks to throw out residents from foreclosed homes or apartments even without notice.

This made Nygren initiate a policy in which the to-be-evictee-due-to-foreclosure must be contacted personally before scheduling the actual eviction. He does not want to see the evictees surprised that one day a moving truck appears at their doorstep, taking away their stuff even if they have a handful of paid rental receipts.

A lot of eviction of renters due to foreclosure is happening in Cook County, Illinois. This made Sheriff Tom Dart to temporarily defer these evictions against court orders.

In McHenry, Deputy Edward Sanderson puts a door red-colored hanger in to-be-foreclosed-homes that needs to be alerted. The residents then have to call for an appointment to meet up with the Sheriff’s office. If no call happens, the deputy needs to re-visit the home around 5 times for the next 5 working days.

These contacts give the deputy the chance to ask questions and know when eviction will be possible. Sgt. Duane Cedergren says that eviction usually is scheduled 1 to 2 months after the arrival of the notice at the sheriff’s office.

Cedergen said that around 100 foreclosure-linked evictions occurred this year, marking a great number of Illinois foreclosure cases.

This simple gesture of notification makes eviction less traumatic. Cedergen even considers it fulfilling. Then, the to-be-evicted express their appreciation to the sheriff office’s efforts in warning them to the foreclosure caused eviction.